SOULfeast 4 — The Way into Jerusalem

“Each person sits next to their own pool of tears.”

Trevor Hudson

SOULfeast 3 — The Way Up the Mountain

Six days later, Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain apart, by themselves. And he was transfigured before them.

Mark 9:2-8

SOULfeast 2 — The Way to Galilee

Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God.

“The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God is near.

Repent and believe the good news!”

Mark 1:14-14 (NIV)

Heading to Lake Junaluska, NC

St. Francis awaits SoulFeast
St. Francis awaits SoulFeast

We’ve met and planned, shopped and gathered, packed and loaded the trucks, and today we’re heading to Lake Junaluska to host SoulFeast, the soulful retreat. Please pray for traveling mercies for all those who are making their way to the event. Opening worship will be Sunday night. Trevor Hudson will be preaching about “The Way to the Jordan” and we’ll celebrate our baptism. The youth will be assisting in the ritual for this service.

Jay Voorhees, Pam Hawkins, and I will be setting up the worship space, designed by Karla Kincannon. (Karla will be joining us on Tuesday and can take over the set up then.)

We’re expecting somewhere between 450 and 500 participants. Children, youth, and young adults will be participating in age-appropriate programs.

Tuesday afternoon, I’ll be participating in a book signing featuring all the Upper Room authors present at SoulFeast. That’ll be the first book signing for The Uncluttered Heart. (Wish you could be there!)

Blessings, everyone. Pray for us. We’ll be praying for the world.

Interview with Beth, part 2

"The Biltmore"
"The Biltmore"

A few months ago, The Upper Room interviewed me for a prototype of a new magazine. The magazine didn’t launch, but I still have the interview. Here’s part two. (Back to part one.)

Upper Room: What are some of your earliest memories of praying or of seeing others pray?

Beth: My dad was a Methodist preacher, so seeing him pray was an early memory for me. We had prayers before meals and observed the church seasons (especially Advent!) in our family. I don’t remember this, but a family story is told that when I was about 3 or 4, my grandpa found me sitting in an old outhouse (“The Biltmore”) at our vacation cabin in Colorado. He asked me what I was doing. I said I was “just sitting here thinking about God.” So I guess my contemplative side started early. [Laughs.]

Upper Room: What advice would you give to someone who wants to pray but doesn’t quite know how to begin?

Beth: Anne Lamott says in Traveling Mercies that the two best prayers she knows are “‘Help me, Help me, Help me,’ and ‘Thank you, Thank you, Thank you.'” Prayer doesn’t have to be formal, fancy, or profound. Prayer is just connecting to God — by talking, by listening, by noticing where God is in our day. In a way, I think praying is just opening our eyes and seeing what’s already there. When I see the beautiful moon rising when I’m driving home, my feelings are a prayer. When I see or hear an ambulance driving by, the hitch in my breath is a prayer of compassion for the person who is in crisis. Think about people or situations that need God’s love and care. And ask God to walk with you through the day. Try that out for a month and then ask God what’s next. Then … Listen. I believe that God will help guide the process.