Prayer Resouces

Spring time at Radnor Lake
Spring time at Radnor Lake

Some resources from my recent workshop on Prayer in Daily Life, United Methodist Womens Assembly, St. Louis, MO.

Events

I hope you’ll consider joining me in July at SOULfeast, Lake Junaluska, NC. Learn more …

Upper Room Prayer Center

The Prayer Center is a resource for you — a place where you can request prayer and also volunteer to pray for others. I hope you’ll stop by and consider becoming a prayer volunteer. Stop by.

Books

The Uncluttered Heart: Making Room for God During Advent and Christmas
by Beth A. Richardson

Child of the Light: Walking through Advent and Christmas by Beth A. Richardson

The Upper Room Worshipbook

Creating a Life with God by Daniel Wolpert

Leading a Life with God by Daniel Wolpert

We All See the Same Moon

We all see the same moon
We all see the same moon

The homeless men I cooked for last night …

The people in Haiti …

A small child full of wonder …

Jesus, Abraham, Mohammad, Buddha …

My dad, suffering from Alzheimer’s …

We all walk the the same earth, breathe the same air,

Drink the same water, feel the same hunger.

When others mourn, we all suffer.

We all see the same moon.

God, give us hearts of compassion. Amen.

Support Haiti

United Methodist Committee on Relief

Interview with Beth, part 2

"The Biltmore"
"The Biltmore"

A few months ago, The Upper Room interviewed me for a prototype of a new magazine. The magazine didn’t launch, but I still have the interview. Here’s part two. (Back to part one.)

Upper Room: What are some of your earliest memories of praying or of seeing others pray?

Beth: My dad was a Methodist preacher, so seeing him pray was an early memory for me. We had prayers before meals and observed the church seasons (especially Advent!) in our family. I don’t remember this, but a family story is told that when I was about 3 or 4, my grandpa found me sitting in an old outhouse (“The Biltmore”) at our vacation cabin in Colorado. He asked me what I was doing. I said I was “just sitting here thinking about God.” So I guess my contemplative side started early. [Laughs.]

Upper Room: What advice would you give to someone who wants to pray but doesn’t quite know how to begin?

Beth: Anne Lamott says in Traveling Mercies that the two best prayers she knows are “‘Help me, Help me, Help me,’ and ‘Thank you, Thank you, Thank you.'” Prayer doesn’t have to be formal, fancy, or profound. Prayer is just connecting to God — by talking, by listening, by noticing where God is in our day. In a way, I think praying is just opening our eyes and seeing what’s already there. When I see the beautiful moon rising when I’m driving home, my feelings are a prayer. When I see or hear an ambulance driving by, the hitch in my breath is a prayer of compassion for the person who is in crisis. Think about people or situations that need God’s love and care. And ask God to walk with you through the day. Try that out for a month and then ask God what’s next. Then … Listen. I believe that God will help guide the process.

Interview with Beth, Part 1

Rose breasted grosbeak in my backyard
Rose breasted grosbeak in my backyard

A few months ago, The Upper Room interviewed me for a prototype of a new magazine. The magazine didn’t launch, but I still have the interview. Here’s part one.

Upper Room: How do you pray?

Beth: I usually take some time for prayer each morning before I leave the house. It’s not a great lot of time — maybe ten minutes or less. Sometimes I read a daily reflections book like Openings by Larry Peacock. I have some set prayers that I say each day, helping me to get connected to God and asking God to guide me through the day. Currently I like to do this at the breakfast table — I like to look outside at the birds at the bird feeder. If the birds need food, I go out and fill up the feeder. Over the past year or so, seeing the birds makes me think of the scripture where Jesus talked about the birds and how they don’t store food, but trust in God to be fed every day (Luke 12:22-29). I’m sort of a worrier, and seeing the birds, feeding the birds, helps me have faith rather than fear.

During the day, I don’t have intentional times of prayer, but I’ll often find myself praying a breath prayer. I developed a breath prayer a couple of years ago when I was going through a stressful time. I used it so much back then that I find myself praying it unconsciously. The prayer is like this:  inhaling, I say, “Loving God.” Exhaling, I say, “I am yours.” Sometimes, if there’s a specific need I have, I’ll consciously change the words of the breath prayer to address the situation I’m in. Like if I’m afraid, I could replace the second half with “I trust in you.”

I want to add a prayer time to the end of my day, but I haven’t found the right fit for me yet. I’m interested in doing an “examen” at the end of each day, looking back on my day and evaluating what had happened. I believe that when I find the right way to do it, it will fall into place. There are so many different ways to pray that there’s bound to be a pattern, a prayer method, etc., that will fit me. I don’t think there is such a thing as a “one-size-fits-all” way to pray.

To be continued ….

The Science of Spirituality

dscn0019_2This week on NPR I listened to a fascinating series called The Science of Spirituality.  NPR religion correspondent and author of the  book Fingerprints of God, Barbara Bradley Hagerty, created the five-part series on All Things Considered.

Hagerty explored questions such as:

My favorite part was the description of how the brain changes when people engage in regular prayer and meditation. People become more connected, more compassionate. United Methodist minister, Scott McDermott, is featured in segment three. Researchers did a scan of his brain while he was engaged in intercessory prayer. Neuroscientist Richard Davidson said that after two weeks of meditation, there were distinct changes in the brain.

That’s what I want — for my spiritual practice to be such a regular part of my life that my brain actually changes. It takes “spiritual formation” or “participating in the mind of Christ” to a new level, doesn’t it?